Chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents

Cover of: Chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents |

Published by IASP Press in Seattle .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Pain -- therapy -- Adolescent,
  • Pain -- therapy -- Child,
  • Chronic Disease -- Adolescent,
  • Chronic Disease -- Child

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

Statementeditors, Patrick J. McGrath, G. Allen Finley.
SeriesProgress in pain research and management -- v. 13
ContributionsMcGrath, Patrick J., Finley, G. Allen, 1954-
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 275 p. :
Number of Pages275
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21714504M
ISBN 100931092272
LC Control Number99023564
OCLC/WorldCa41326156

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Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents provides a practical guide for implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy (Cbt) for children and their families coping with the consequences of persisting pain.

The book is divided into three sections. The first section presents a brief history, theoretical foundations, and background concerning the development of Cbt Cited by: Chronic And Recurrent Pain by Tonya M.

Palermo, Cbt For Chronic Pain In Children And Adolescents Books available in PDF, EPUB, Mobi Format. Download Cbt For Chronic Pain In Children And Adolescents books, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents provides instruction on the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for children and their families coping with.

Chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. Seattle: IASP Press, © (OCoLC) Online version: Chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. Seattle: IASP Press, © (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Patrick J McGrath; G Allen Finley.

Chapters 5–9 detail specific chronic pain syndromes seen in children and adolescents. These latter chapters are of practical clinical significance for both pediatricians and child and adolescent psychiatrists—neuropathic pain, sickle cell disease pain, recurrent headaches, recurrent abdominal pain, and musculoskeletal pain are the specific Author: Michelle K.

Leff. Pain is an increasingly common symptom in children and adolescents. Once recurrent pain leads to pain-related disability that affects a child’s functional, emotional and social well-being, it is considered a chronic pain disorder.

Estimated to affect approximately 15% to 30% of children, chronic and recurrent pain occurs most commonly in the pediatric population without. Children experiencing persistent or recurrent chronic pain (hereafter referred to as chronic pain) may miss school, withdraw from social activities, and are at risk of developing internalizing symptoms in response to their pain.

Given these consequences, issues related to pediatric chronic pain (eg, prevalence, age of onset, epidemiology, etiology, assessment, and treatment) are important. Background. Highly disabling chronic pain is a frequent complaint in children, with consistent prevalence estimates of approximately five percent in Western countries [].This condition can cause severe impairments for the child and suffering for his/her family [].Costs are also exorbitant in paediatric chronic pain [].These children access a variety of healthcare services, including primary.

By definition, chronic or recurrent abdominal pain must occur at least 4 times each month for at least 2 months. Abdominal pain complaints begin as soon as a child can provide an accurate pain history, usually around age 7 years but occasionally younger. Before that age, children have difficulty separating emotional distress from physical pain.

Chronic pain among children and adolescents: physician consultation and medication use. Clin J Pain. ;16(3) 4.

Hechler T, Dobe M, Zernikow B. Commentary: A worldwide call for multimodal inpatient treatment for children and adolescents suffering from chronic pain and pain-related disability. J Pediatr Psychol. chronic pain is a uniquely adult problem.

Chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents is now known to have a point prevalence of at least 15%.1Girls report more pain than boys, and the incidence peaks at an average age of 14 years. The most common complaint is headache, followed by recurrent abdominal pain.

The etiology of chronic pain is best understood within a biopsychosocial framework, which emphasizes the intersection of biological processes, psychological factors, and social/environmental influences in both the onset and maintenance of chronic pain. Children and adolescents with chronic pain can experience disability of physical function.

Introduction. Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) is one of the most frequent bodily complaints in childhood and adolescence [1, 2] and is associated with a high psychosocial burden, poor functioning, and low health-related quality of life [3, 4].Furthermore, CAP represents the most common reason for consultations with pediatric gastroenterologists [], and children with the condition show higher.

Chronic pain is common and affects approximately one-quarter to one-third of all children and adolescents. Older age, female sex and stress could be identified as risk factors. Overall, 5% of all children and adolescents suffer severely from chronic pain and are in need of an interdisciplinary pain treatment.

While extrapolation may be reasonable for many medications used for acute pain, the problem is much more challenging for chronic and recurrent pain. The latter is relatively common in children, with epidemiological surveys reporting prevalence of % in community samples of children and adolescents.

Chronic pain can affect nearly every aspect of daily life and is associated with disability, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Objectives. The aim of this review was to update the published evidence on the efficacy of psychological treatments for chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents.

Pain is an increasingly common symptom in children and adolescents. Once recurrent pain leads to pain-related disability that affects a child’s functional, emotional and social well-being, it is considered a chronic pain disorder. Such disorders can develop as the primary condition or be due to a well-defined underlying physical condition Manufacturer: Springer.

Children and adolescents with chronic abdominal pain pose unique challenges to their caregivers. Affected children and their families experience distress and anxiety that can interfere with their ability to perform regular daily activities. Although chronic abdominal pain in children is usually attributable to a functional disorder rather than organic disease, numerous misconceptions.

This review is an update of a previously published review in The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Eccleston ) on ’Psychological therapies for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents’. Chronic and recurrent pain (pain lasting more than three months) is a common problem in young people.

Chronic pain in childhood and adolescence is more common than is reported and prevalence rates vary substantially between data from different studies. 6 Children experiencing persistent or recurrent chronic pain may miss school or withdraw from social activities and are at risk of developing internalizing symptoms in response to their pain Author: Santhanam Suresh, Ravi Shah.

Chronic and recurrent pain not associated with a disease is very common in childhood and adolescence, but studies of pain prevalence have yielded inconsistent findings. This systematic review examined studies of chronic and recurrent pain prevalence to provide updated aggregated prevalence rates.

Chronic abdominal pain is common in children and adolescents. The evaluation of the child or adolescent with chronic abdominal pain requires an understanding of the pathogenesis of abdominal pain, the most common causes of abdominal pain in children and adolescents, and the typical patterns of presentation.

Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children is defined as at least three episodes of pain that occur over at least three months and affect the child’s ability to perform normal activities. RAP is.

Abstract Background This is an update of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 1,and previously updated in and Chronic pain affects many children, who report severe pain, disability, and distressed mood. Psychological therapies are emerging as effective interventions to treat children with chronic or recurrent pain.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents - Kindle edition by Palermo Ph.D., Tonya M.

Professional & Technical Kindle eBooks @ Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents 1st Edition, Kindle Edition by Tonya M.

Palermo Ph.D. (Author) Format: Kindle EditionManufacturer: Oxford University Press. For children and adolescents, there is evidence that relaxation by itself and cognitive behavioural therapy (treatment that helps people test and revise their thoughts and actions) are effective in reducing the intensity of pain in chronic headache, recurrent abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, and sickle cell disease immediately after treatment.

This review is an update of a previously published review in the Cochrane Library on 'Psychological therapies for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents' (Eccleston ; Eccleston ; Eccleston ; Eccleston ).

Chronic (pain lasting more than three months) and recurrent pain is a common problem in young people. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents provides a practical guide for implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for children and their families coping with the consequences of persisting pain.

The book is divided into three sections. Philadelphia, PA, December 8, – Children who suffer from persistent or recurring chronic pain may miss school, withdraw from social activities, and are at risk of developing internalizing symptoms such as anxiety, in response to their pain.

In the first comprehensive review of chronic pain in children and adolescents in 20 years, a group of researchers found that more children now are.

Psychological therapies for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online).

Inthe pediatric Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials made recommendations concerning outcome domains (and measures) that are important to assess in children and adolescents who have acute, chronic, or recurrent pain.

24 Seven domains in addition to pain intensity were identified: physical, emotional. Chronic pain is a significant problem in children and teens, and adolescents with chronic pain often struggle to attend school on a regular basis.

We present in this article a novel program we developed that integrates attendance at a group cognitive-behavioural chronic pain self-management program with earning high school credits. Aim: The aim of this study was to describe a paediatric primary care pain sample and examine associations between pain, health‐related quality of life and disability.

Methods: The study design is descriptive and cross‐sectional. One hundred and fifty‐four consecutive children and adolescents between the ages of 8 and 16 seeking care for a pain‐related conditions participated in.

Chronic and recurrent pain is a common complaint in children and adolescents. The most common types of pain include headaches, abdominal pain and musculoskeletal pain. King et al (1) conducted a systematic review of the prevalence of chronic pain in children Author: Sara Ahola Kohut, Jennifer Stinson.

Background: This is an update of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 1,and previously updated in and Chronic pain affects many children, who report severe pain, disability, and distressed mood.

Psychological therapies are emerging as effective interventions to treat children with chronic or recurrent pain. Finally, this new measure asks patients to recall pain in the last 7 days.

This may be problematic for recurrent pain that only occurs once, twice or 3 times a month (such as migraine or chronic abdominal pain). Indeed, to understand less frequent acute or recurrent pain, daily diaries or an event-based approach might be more appropriate.

Persistent pain can also have a substantial effect on the emotional status of children and adolescents. In general, children with recurrent pain experience more stress, feel less cheerful, and feel more depressed than do children without pain. 44 Higher levels of depressive symptoms are associated with higher levels of pain both in children.

Recent epidemiological data have made nonsense of the prejudice that chronic pain is a uniquely adult problem.

Chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents is now known to have a point prevalence of at least 15%.1 Girls report more pain than boys, and the incidence peaks at an average age of 14 years. The most common complaint is headache, followed by recurrent abdominal pain.

Chan E, Piira T, Betts G. The school functioning of children with chronic and recurrent pain. Pediatric Pain Letter. ;7() Logan DE, Simons LE, Stein MJ, Chastain L.

School impairment in adolescents with chronic pain. J Pain. ;9(5) Konijnenberg AY, Uiterwaal CS, Kimpen JL, et al. Children with unexplained chronic pain. The number of children and adolescents hospitalized for chronic pain — defined as recurrent or continuous pain lasting more than three months — increased ninefold between and For these young patients, adjusting to and living with pain can be overwhelming.

Chronic abdominal pain (long-standing intermittent or constant abdominal pain) is common in children and adolescents. In most children, chronic abdominal pain is functional, that is, without objective evidence of an underlying organic disorder. Yet, an important part of the physician's job is to determine which children have an organic disorder.Summary Chronic pain is prevalent in children and adolescents, with headaches being most common.

Quality assessment indicated that most epidemiological studies do not meet quality criteria. ABSTRACT Chronic and recurrent pain not associated with a disease is very common in childhood and adolescence, but studies of pain prevalence have yielded inconsistent findings. CHRONIC RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN OVERVIEW.

Chronic and recurrent abdominal pain is common in children, and the term "functional pain disorder" refers to pain for which a specific cause (by history, physical examination, or laboratory tests) has not been found. It occurs in 9 to 15 percent of all children.

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